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February 21, 2008

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I'm not a vet. I know nothing about what causes those problems in deer, but for humans, being born with glaucoma or other medical problems, or having a severe trauma or injury can cause abnormal eye color. Pretty neat though. Very interesting. 

I was thinking glaucoma as well. Very strange no matter what.

my guess would be trauma, or disease??

Without the aid of examination my best guess would be simple loss of color pigment due to the genetic quirk of the recessive genes of albinoism,though in this case removed by several generations. At least that is the cause in humand whom are born with white eyes....FTR they eyes are not white at all but lack pigment.

that is really cool how you get the mount with white eyes that would be a great mount

That's crazy. You would think it would be from old age but he doesn't look that old. Like Big Daddy said earlier, it must be some weird genetic thing. I can't believe it didn't impair his vision.

Looks like he stared at one of those 25 million candle light spotlights...cooked his eye balls right in his head

Way cool. This is a first for me as well. Never seen "white"tail eyes like this one.

WE LIVE IN MADISON,NH , WE HAVE BEEN FEEDING THE DEER BECAUSE OF ALL THE SNOW WE HAVE HAD THIS YEAR. WE HAVE ONE LITTLE DEER THAT HAS WHITE EYES IT IS VERY WIERD. ALL THE REST OF THEM HAVE DARK BROWN EYES. IS THIS NORMAL. THANKS

Ellen, our research shows that this is not very commmon; and the eyes are not to be confused with an albino or piebald (half brown) deer. This probably explains the deer you've been feeding: The white-eyed deer pictured here is most likely suffering from what is known as "ocular albanism." Very simlpy, this is another melanin-related deficieny that affects many humans and forms of wildlife (sort of like the "blue deer" you had awhile back). The presence of melanin in the eyes is the agent that is responsible for most human and animal eyes being brown. Obviously, a complete lack of melanin in the eyes results in ocular albanism, or "eye albanism" and white eyes! Hope this helps

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